North Central IPM Center - all featured articles

USDA grants fund fruit research in North Central region

University of Wisconsin assistant professor and extension specialist in entomology Christelle Guédot has an ambitious summer research agenda while looking ahead to future projects she’d like to tackle. Located in the heart of the North Central fruit belt it’s not surprising that one of the main targets of Guédot’s  research centers on spotted wing drosophila (SWD), an insect pest that economically affects berries. Guédot’s team plans to test whether or not there are spatial or temporal factors affecting infestations on ripening raspberries.

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Green Infrastructure Practices for Stormwater Management and Mosquito Control

      

       The “mosquito” working group of the North Central Integrated Pest Management Center (NCIPMC) was awarded a 2014 grant for $30,000. The group met their objectives in just one year and is continuing their project with a grant from the Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment at the University of Illinois (iSEE).   

                       

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Spotlight on North Central Field Crop Extension Entomologists

 

 

 

Extension field crop entomologists in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) North Central Region were looking for a platform for networking and sharing knowledge when they formed a working group in 2007 and were funded by a grant from the North Central Integrated Pest Management Center (NCIPMC) a year later. Funding for Field Crop Extension Entomologists had declined greatly over the previous decade, and many states had only one faculty member covering these large acreage crops in a state.

 

 

 

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Evaluation, refinement and extension of invasive species predictive maps – a success story

A $71,681 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)  through the North Central Integrated Pest Management Center (NCIPMC) helped researchers determine if habitat suitability models could forecast the spread of an invasive species, especially if key data was added to the model. The team focused on spotted knapweed and wild parsnip in Wisconsin.

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Scientists track gene activity when honey bees do and don't eat honey
Scientists track gene activity when honey bees do and don't eat honey

Many beekeepers feed their honey bees sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup when times are lean inside the hive. This practice has come under scrutiny, however, in response to colony collapse disorder, the massive -- and as yet not fully explained -- annual die-off of honey bees in the U.S. and Europe. Some suspect that inadequate nutrition plays a role in honey bee declines.

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